In House Training

As well as one day seminars, Sporting Difference offers a number of bespoke management training programmes, for groups of people managers from the same organisation, which are based on your specific objectives. In keeping with our seminars, the content is based on proven business models which we bring alive for delegates and show how they can implement them with their teams. As the group is smaller (the ideal size is six to ten) there is a greater level of personal interaction and we are able to debate individual issues during the programme.
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In House Training

As well as one day seminars, Sporting Difference offers a number of bespoke management training programmes, for groups of people managers from the same organisation, which are based on your specific objectives. In keeping with our seminars, the content is based on proven business models which we bring alive for delegates and show how they can implement them with their teams. As the group is smaller (the ideal size is six to ten) there is a greater level of personal interaction and we are able to debate individual issues during the programme.
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Programmes are typically of two days duration to allow us to get into sufficient detail with each individual and ensure that everyone understands, and is comfortable with, how to apply the ideas, skills and techniques in their own environments. Course content will be agreed following a thorough analysis of what you are trying to achieve from the programme and how that fits with your organisation objectives. However, management training will typically cover some or all of the following areas: Management versus Leadership Often misunderstood, most people managers need to be able to do both effectively. Very few can explain the difference and often make the mistake of believing that it is simply down to the personality of the manager. Most managers will say that they manage different people in different ways, but what few realise is that the same person needs to be managed differently according to the task they are undertaking.

As an example, a highly experienced individual, let’s call them David, who is good at their job and remains well motivated would normally be left to get on with their tasks unhindered. In fact, if the manager started looking over David’s shoulder and offering advice they might find they turn their well motivated employee into someone who begins to complain a lot! However, if a new person starts in the department it is common practice to give them to David so that he can “show them the ropes”. David might be very good at doing the task but now he’s being asked to train someone else to do it which, for him, is a totally different and possibly disconcerting task. Using a sporting analogy, how often do great footballers make poor coaches because they can do but they can’t explain. In this circumstance simply leaving David with the new person might be the worst thing you can do. This is a simple mistake to avoid and the programme will give managers some structure and guidelines they can use to ensure that they change the way they manage based on tangible factors. Motivation Irrespective of what job they do all staff will need a helping hand with their motivation from time to time.

The most common mistake is for managers to confuse happiness with motivation. We knew of a team that were very happy at work, mainly because they spent most of their time drinking coffee and chatting about last night’s TV. Productivity was, as you would imagine, somewhat lower than required! We show managers how to balance the need to achieve the objectives with the needs of the people.The most well established beliefs and theories of motivation are introduced and then used as a building block for practical, real life actions that can be taken to increase staff motivation. Coaching Whenever coaching is referred to it is inevitable that we think of sport but coaching is a key skill for all managers if they are to improve the performance of their team. Back to our friend David earlier, he was being asked to be a coach. To explain a skill, technique or process to someone in order that they will be able to use that instruction to successfully learn and complete a task.

This is an area fraught with danger for the unsuspecting manager, explain in a manner considered to be too simplistic and you insult the intelligence of the individual, miss some vital details and the task might be doomed to failure or take longer than necessary. A simple structure will help managers assess how much detail is needed and guidance on their communication style will help them get their point across without causing offence. Communication As a manager the way in which you communicate with your team is under constant scrutiny. The slightest wrong word or intonation can result in disgruntled team members. Underpinning all of the above topics is how the manager communicates with the team. Again using proven models and structures that each manager can apply using their own personality and style, we work with the delegates to ensure that they are comfortable in dealing with this highly sensitive area.